Curio & Co. Product Catalog


, Sep 09, 2015
by Ned Wazowski

Curio & Co. on display

Curio & Co. featured in a new exhibition at Atelier Olschinsky in Vienna, Austria

A new exhibition looks at the playful side of our collections.

Come see Curio & Co. up close and on the walls in a new exhibition at the Atelier Olschinsky Art Store in Vienna.

Titled ‘Let’s Play,’ the exhibition will look back at the last six years in Curio & Co. history. All your favorites will be represented – from Frank and His Friend to Spaceman Jax, from vintage ads to vintage time machines, and plenty of surprises and never-before-seen pieces.

Plus, the exhibition will include an in-depth look at our latest project: The Tarot of Musterberg. The complete deck will be on display, as well as larger-than-life versions of our favorite cards that are sure to deal up fun and fantasy.

Prints of many of the items on display will be for sale at the gallery as well as on their art store website.

Previous shows at the gallery have featured really terrific artists, and we’re honored to be included in that group. From digital landscapes to imaginative topography, each artist brings a wide rage of variety to the gallery. And what you can always expect from Atelier Olschinsky is impeccable craftsmanship and attention to detail.

We’ll be there for the opening, enjoying the trip down memory lane – looking at past projects and how far we’ve come, celebrating the completion of the present project and looking ahead to see where we might go next. If you’re in Vienna, please stop by and join us: Let’s Play!

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, Aug 26, 2015
by Ned Wazowski

What makes packaging work

 Curio & Co. looks at how to make packaging work. Image of package design for Musterberg Deck of Tarot Cards, courtesy of Curio and Co.

When thinking outside the box just isn’t enough

Packaging designers, like burlesque performers, know that pulling off the wrapping as fast as possible isn’t always ideal.

Good packaging can help tell a story. Not only does it provide ample space to squeeze in a little more information about the product or company, but the process of opening a package can tell you how the company wants you to think about the product in general.

Take Apple products as an example. Each Apple product comes with multiple layers of packaging which gives you more to open. This way you feel as if there is more to the product and that you’re getting more for your money. A little manipulative, perhaps, but these stages also help build anticipation so that your appreciation of the product is greater once you have it in your hands. And in an industry where customers are primed to want disposable novelties, helping your customers appreciate what they’ve got sounds great.

However, the materials used in the packaging play just as big a role in developing feelings of appreciation for and value of the product. Those plastic ‘clam-shell’ style packages that take forever to open are not just frustrating, but really don’t feel good in your hands. The slick plastic is hard to grab and painfully sharp if you do manage to get it open. Plus, the fact that it’s so often molded to the shape of the product itself means that it seems like you’re holding it in your hands, but you just can’t get it – which obviously adds to the frustration. However, packages using materials that are more pleasing to the touch – textured paper or soft fabric – give us a better emotional connection to the product and make the actual opening of it more enjoyable and memorable over all.

Putting together the packaging for our reproduction of the Musterberg Tarot Deck, our main interest was in creating something that was archival-quality so that collectors could enjoy it for years to come. So we went with acid-free Munken Pure paper – the same paper used for the cards themselves. The paper is strong but light, so you won’t feel like you’re holding a brick, but rather something that you’d want to pick up again and again. To further protect the box, the paper was coated with a kind of cellophane to ensure the box would hold up to handling, but with a softness that you really will want to touch. The result is downright cuddly. (Seriously, why don’t all paper products use this?)

The best packaging is probably the kind you never get rid of. I know I’ve got a few packages that remain on the shelf although their innards are long gone. In the case of the Musterberg Tarot Deck, we hope you don’t lose the cards. But even if you do, we’re pretty proud of the box.

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, Aug 19, 2015
by Ned Wazowski

Collecting Autographs

Image of an double autograph, signed by 1960s animated TV show character Spaceman Jax, and the production designer who created him, Philip LaCarta. Image

Celebrity spotting is like the IRS – get an autograph as a receipt or no one will believe you.

Although fame seems terrific from the outside, most of us would probably choose to hold on to our privacy and anonymity rather than face screaming fans and a wall of paparazzi. I myself would be content to rub elbows with the famous and still be able to buy kids’ cereal at the supermarket without hassle.

For many, owning something once held by a famous person bring them closer to that person, and collecting autographs from celebrities and historical personages continues to be quite popular.

I haven’t come across very many celebrities in my time, and the few times I have, I wasn’t able to think much past gaping. So I don’t have the autographs to document it. However, as a kid I happily brought my autograph book to amusement parks such as Disneyland, and waited for costumed mascots of my favorite cartoon characters to scrawl their names in my autograph book. Chip and Dale? Got ‘em. Daisy Duck? You betcha. What it must have been like for a college kid sweating in the summer sun to write DOPEY over and over again, I don’t know. But I’ve got that signature to prove that I’ve met some of the greats.

Today rather than stand in line waiting for a guy in a suit, I prefer to collect drawings of my favorite cartoon characters. And if those drawings also happen to have the signature of the artist who created them? I can’t help feeling a little bit famous myself.

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Bunchy - One Is Not Enough - Illustrated vintage magazine ad with woman holding Bunchy Cola (circa 1950's) - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG)

One Is Not Enough


The recipe for simulated gold flakes is about the best kept secret in soft drink...

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