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Frank and His Friend - Special Collector's Edition Vol. 1 - curioandco.com

Frank and His Friend - Special Collector's Edition, Vol. 1

Frank and His Friend seems to get sweeter each time you read it. The turn of a page takes you from a moment of joyful exuberance where adventure could literally be waiting just around the corner, to a scene of warm tenderness where you can almost feel the hug.

This special collector’s edition captures all of that, in 128 pages of comics not seen in Time for Frank and His Friend or the Eisner-nominated Finding Frank and His Friend. What’s more, each image was selected by Frank and His Friend...

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$7.95
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Spaceman Jax - "A Gem of an Idea" -  Jim Dewicky - animation production drawing - Two mantagons mining cristals - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

"A Gem of an Idea"

Spaceman Jax

This original production drawing by Jim Dewicky is from the episode “A Gem of an Idea” broadcast originally in 1962....

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$135.00
Spaceman Jax - "A Gem of an Idea" 2 -  Jim Dewicky - animation production drawing - Mantagon on a rope - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

"A Gem of an Idea" 2

Spaceman Jax

This original production drawing by Jim Dewicky is from the episode “A Gem of an Idea” broadcast originally in 1962....

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$135.00
Spaceman Jax - "A Gem of an Idea" 3 -  Jim Dewicky - production drawing - Mantagon sketch - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

"A Gem of an Idea" 3

Spaceman Jax

Giclèe Reproduction        $   49.00 Original Drawing           $   150.00   This original production drawing by Jim Dewicky is...

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$49.00
Spaceman Jax - "A Jax by Any Other Name" - Jax hugs Jax - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

"A Jax by Any Other Name"

Spaceman Jax

Giclee reproduction of original production drawing by Jim Dewicky is from the episode “A Jax by Any Other Name” broadcast...

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$49.00
Spaceman Jax - "A Jax of All Trades" -  Jim Dewicky - animation production drawing - Jax shows things - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

"A Jax of All Trades"

Spaceman Jax

This original production drawing by Jim Dewicky is from the episode “A Jax of All Trades” broadcast originally in 1962....

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$110.00
Spaceman Jax - "A Mantagon Mystery" -  Jim Dewicky - production drawing - Mantagon show off his muscles - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

"A Mantagon Mystery"

Spaceman Jax

Giclèe Reproduction        $   49.00 Original Drawing           $   140.00   This original production drawing by Jim Dewicky is...

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$49.00
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, Aug 25, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Summertime Treats: Cotton Candy

Curio & Co. looks at nostalgia for summertime treats from childhood with cotton candy. Image of children very excited to be served cotton candy. Source, Heinz Family Fund/Carnegie Museum of Art. www.curioandco.com

Nostalgia at its stickiest.

Cotton Candy is a delightful summertime treat, and one that seems to sum up a lot of summer experiences. From a distance, it’s big and bold and commands a lot of attention – the same way summer vacations loom large in our anticipation and are the subjects of so many of our daydreams. It is available at so many summer destinations and it’s perfect for sharing. But alas, just like summer trips to the beach or summer tans or even a summer fling, the cotton candy melts away too soon and you’re left with air where your summer dreams once were.

Spun sugar, the precursor to cotton candy, was high class when it first appeared in Europe in the 18th century. It was spun by hand back then and was so labor intensive that it wasn’t available to us common folks. However, once machine-spun cotton candy was invented in 1897 – by a dentist no less – wider audiences got a taste of the sweet stuff.

At the St. Louis World’s Fair where cotton candy was first introduced in 1904, a box of the stuff (then called fairy floss) cost nearly half the price of admission to the fair itself. Today you can find cotton candy at county fairs, circus tents, amusement parks and vendors along the boardwalk in a variety of colors. And sure, you’re just eating pure sugar, but it’s far less sugar than a soft drink, so as summertime treats go, it’s not that bad.

Cotton candy contains summer magic. How else can you explain that it looks like cotton wool but melts on your tongue like a snowflake?

Image:Heinz Family Fund/Carnegie Museum of Art

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