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Curio & Co. Product Catalog

Care in handling

Protection you can see through

Your print is protected in its own CrystalView archival cellophane sleeve which keeps it dust-free and smudge free and ensures that you’ll get the product as near to perfect as humanly possible. You may opt to keep your print within its sleeve, and why not? It will continue to keep your print safe and is glare-free to boot. If you can’t decide, don’t worry. The cellophane sleeve is resealable.

 

For archival storage, the print is mounted with archival-quality, removable microdots on an acid-free backing. Gently lifting the print to separate the two will allow the print to be mounted and framed. If you do frame the piece, we recommend using UV glass to protect the image from sunlight, which can discolor the print.

 

 

Safe in shipping

The non-descript brown envelope is certainly misleading. Aside from the Curio & Co. stamp on the front, it barely hints at the fantastic artwork contained inside. Still, it has to be plain because it’s got to be sturdy. The only way we can sleep at night is by knowing that your print won’t get knocked around or snagged on anything. And that brown envelope – in comforting, durable cardboard – puts our minds at rest. Plus, it’s acid-free and fully recyclable. So you can put your environmental worries aside and get a good night’s sleep too.

 

 

 

 

Tagged from us to you

That tag you find is another sign that you’ve got a genuine Curio & Co. item in your hands. You can snip off the tag if you like – which will feel great, knowing that the print is all yours now! – or you can slip the tag through the knot to get to the envelope’s pull tab. The envelope flap’s seal will keep the tag on the envelope so you can keep a record of what’s inside.

 

Giving the item as a gift? What a terrific friend you are! In that case, you can write the name of your sure-to-be grateful friend on the reverse of the tag, and your wrapping is done! We won’t ever slip the bill or any other pesky sign of your item’s purchase history in the envelope, so feel free to keep your secret of what a great deal you got.


Oberpfaffendorfer - Glamour Roast - Illustrated vintage poster ad with flapper drinking coffee (circa 1920's) "Exotic Aroma" - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Glamour Roast

Oberpfaffendorfer

There’s nothing glamorous about Monday mornings. I guess if Mondays mean starting your trek through...

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$119.00
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, Apr 14, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

What makes a TV personality?

Curio & Co. takes a look at what makes a TV personality different from other celebrities - retro photo of 1950s woman looking at a magazine with a vintage TV showing Art Linkletter's classic tv show Kids Say the Darndest Things. Curio and Co. OG. www.curioandco.com 

There are plenty of people famous for rather dubious talents on television, with “nice guy” perhaps the most dubious.

With the recent news that Stephen Colbert will be taking over when David Letterman retires next year, we’ve been thinking a lot about the backgrounds of TV celebrities. Although he started his career as a newscaster, Letterman caught the attention of the studios through his stand-up comedy. His successor Colbert also has a background in comedy, having got his big break with Chicago improve troop The Second City.

While most late night hosts share similar backgrounds, there are plenty of daytime hosts with more dubious histories. Some of them are journalists, certainly, but many blur the line between “famous on television” and simply being (thanks to reality TV) “famous for being on television.” Celebrity rosters filled with “reality stars” is kind of a recent phenomenon, but television (and radio before that) has always given us celebrities we didn’t quite know how to categorize – we called them “personalities.”

TV personalities sometimes hosted or presented shows, such as Bob Barker, Chuck Woolery or Dick Clark. But many were famous simply for being charming, witty and good sports, like Ed McMahon or Shadoe Stevens (from the center square).

Art Linkletter is one TV personality who parlayed his good-naturedness into an interesting career. He started rather straight-forwardly in radio (KGB in San Diego) doing some acting but mostly presenting programs. His most well-known programs – Kids Say the Darndest Things and People are Funny – started on radio and continued on television, even expanding into books and comics. Known for his approachable demeanor and his witty repartee, Linkletter made his personality a household name, even licensing his name and likeness to Milton Bradley to endorse their ‘Game of Life’. (Does your version in the family game closet have his picture on the money? Ours does.)

Since it’s being reported that Stephen Colbert will leave his larger than life fictional persona behind when he moves to network television, it’s hard to know what to expect from him as a real-world host. Perhaps he too will make the time-honored transition from comedian to simply, “personality.”

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