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Curio & Co. Product Catalog

Care in handling

Protection you can see through

Your print is protected in its own CrystalView archival cellophane sleeve which keeps it dust-free and smudge free and ensures that you’ll get the product as near to perfect as humanly possible. You may opt to keep your print within its sleeve, and why not? It will continue to keep your print safe and is glare-free to boot. If you can’t decide, don’t worry. The cellophane sleeve is resealable.

 

For archival storage, the print is mounted with archival-quality, removable microdots on an acid-free backing. Gently lifting the print to separate the two will allow the print to be mounted and framed. If you do frame the piece, we recommend using UV glass to protect the image from sunlight, which can discolor the print.

 

 

Safe in shipping

The non-descript brown envelope is certainly misleading. Aside from the Curio & Co. stamp on the front, it barely hints at the fantastic artwork contained inside. Still, it has to be plain because it’s got to be sturdy. The only way we can sleep at night is by knowing that your print won’t get knocked around or snagged on anything. And that brown envelope – in comforting, durable cardboard – puts our minds at rest. Plus, it’s acid-free and fully recyclable. So you can put your environmental worries aside and get a good night’s sleep too.

 

 

 

 

Tagged from us to you

That tag you find is another sign that you’ve got a genuine Curio & Co. item in your hands. You can snip off the tag if you like – which will feel great, knowing that the print is all yours now! – or you can slip the tag through the knot to get to the envelope’s pull tab. The envelope flap’s seal will keep the tag on the envelope so you can keep a record of what’s inside.

 

Giving the item as a gift? What a terrific friend you are! In that case, you can write the name of your sure-to-be grateful friend on the reverse of the tag, and your wrapping is done! We won’t ever slip the bill or any other pesky sign of your item’s purchase history in the envelope, so feel free to keep your secret of what a great deal you got.


Roger Believe - First Flight (Primo Volo) - Illustrated comic book cover of Roger and eagles through the clouds (circa 1980's) for an adventure in the vain of Dylan Dog and Martin Mystery - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

First Flight (Primo Volo)

Roger Believe

This giclée of the 1986 Roger Believe cover of First Flight (Primo Volo) is part...

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$49.00
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, Sep 24, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Don’t change that channel

Curio & Co. looks at the power of a TV marathon, image of Spaceman Jax animation cell from 1960s classic animated series Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures. www.curioandco.com

Everything comes to a halt for a TV marathon

When I was a kid TV marathons were an annual event. Every year some TV station would show a day’s worth of Elvis movies on his birthday, monster movies in the lead up to Halloween, and all the Rankin and Bass claymation Christmas specials seemed to run in a continuous loop throughout the holiday season. Needless to say, my TV calendar was full the whole year long.

However, my favorite TV marathon was the weekend of Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures cartoons that the local station showed late in the summer. Looking back, I don’t know if they showed them in order or even if they showed all of the episodes, but I always felt that if you missed one you would “interrupt the flow” and miss out on something. So to prepare, I made snacks in advance and diligently did all of my chores ahead of time to be sure that I’d never have to leave the couch. (My parents, I should say, were very understanding and maybe just the tiniest bit glad to get me out of their hair for a weekend.)

We didn’t call it binge-watching back then, maybe because we felt it was beyond our control – and when you’re rushing to take a shower in the time it takes for a commercial break, you really do feel at the mercy of someone else. But I suppose the TV marathon of the past is the same today. It might not seem like such an impossibly big event today, since watching endless episodes back-to-back is so much easier to do, with online streaming on demand and the ability to press pause. Is binge-watching today as much fun as the TV marathons I enjoyed as a kid? If I can still spend a weekend on the couch watching Spaceman Jax cartoons, I guess I don’t care what you call it.

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