Curio & Co. Product Catalog

The printing process


What is a giclée?

Glad you asked. A giclée is a high-quality, digitally-produced fine art print. The term was coined in 1991 by Jack Duganne at Nash Editions to distinguish archival-quality prints from the utilitarian proofs of standard inkjet printers.

The image is generated from high-resolution digital scans of the original and allows for the incredibly detailed prints seen in museums and galleries. A giclée provides better color accuracy than any other type of reproduction, and has all the tonalities and hues of the original work.


Paper as good as money

Our giclées are printed on cotton paper (otherwise known as ‘rag paper’). Cotton paper is stronger and more durable than wood pulp paper, and resists fading, discoloration or deterioration, so it’s used for important documents and archival-quality artwork. Cotton paper is what they use to print money – which just goes to show what a good investment it is. (If it’s good enough for the National Treasury, it’s good enough for us.)

Our paper comes from Hahnemühle FineArt GmbH, which has been manufacturing paper since 1584. Their paper is made with pure spring water and high-grade cotton, and traditional recipes are still used to make paper for painters, illustrators, bookbinders, and of course, Curio & Co.


Pigments to last

Special artwork and special paper requires special ink. Our giclées use pigment inks, rather than the standard dye-based inks used in regular printers. Pigment inks provide better image stability and last longer and than any other method. Since the pigment doesn’t dissolve completely and soak into the paper the way that dye-based inks do, pigment inks are more water resistant and won’t bleed at the edges of an image. What’s more, because pigment molecules stack themselves on top of the paper, it’s harder for sunlight or chemicals to react with the pigment molecules – making the image highly resistant to fading.

For all of this, of course, pigment inks are more expensive than dye-based inks, but when protected from air and sunlight, these inks will last many, many years. And when something looks this good, you want to keep it around.


Roger Believe - Invitation from the Subconscious (L'Invito Di Subconscio) - Illustrated comic book cover of Roger seeing a skeletal self reflected in the mirror (circa 1980's) for an adventure in the vain of Dylan Dog and Martin Mystery - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Invitation from the Subconscious (L'Invito ...

Roger Believe

This giclée of the 1986 Roger Believe cover of Invitation from the Subconscious (L'Invito Di...

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$49.00
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, Jan 11, 2015
by Ned Wazowski

Pinterest: taking your childhood collections online

Curio & Co. celebrates 2000 followers on Pinterest. Image from www.curioandco.com

Reinventing the simple scrapbook

We’re pleased as punch to find that we’ve reached 2000 followers on Pinterest. Pinning collections and boards on Pinterest is a lot of fun, and when you find people to share it with who enjoy it as much as you, it just makes the fun a little sweeter, you know?

And Pinterest is a lot of fun. From the discovery of new artists or missed classics, to reconnecting with childhood favorites, Pinterest never fails to give us an “Oh, yeah” moment with each pin. Plus, while some of us in the office are very organized and others are… very, very disorganized, rearranging pins and creating new boards is the aspect we all love. Is Play-Doh a toy, an art supply or… a food? Having this kind of dialog and playing these kinds of games with the pins always puts a smile on our faces.

Best of all, Pinterest, for all its cutting edge technology and social media wizardry, really takes us back to the old-fashioned scrapbook collections that we all had as kids. Jay had a binder where he kept trading cards of all the World Cup players along with his own hand-written stats from his youth soccer league games. Shirley had strips of Frank and His Friend comics that she cut from newspapers to create her own comic books. I had an epic sticker book, with stickers divided up by type (puffy, smelly, iridescent) and subject matter (Spaceman Jax, of course, and so many Smurfs). What kind of scrapbooks did you keep as a kid?

For Pinterest co-founder Ben Silbermann, it was a bug collection. He dried and pinned and labeled all kinds of creepy crawlies, and it was that fascination with bug collections that helped inspire the creation of Pinterest. “I’d always thought that the things you collect say so much about who you are,” said Silbermann in a speech from 2012. We couldn’t agree more.

As an online scrapbook, Pinterest allows us to reinvent collecting, and lets us collect things that just wouldn’t have been possible before the Internet. You’re no longer limited to wall space or scrapbook size, but now you can also collect intangible or abstract ideas and collect things that no longer exist or might not have ever existed in the first place.

If you’re not a Pinterest user, you should give it a try, because it’s a huge help and source of inspiration to collectors of all sorts. And if you are on Pinterest, let us know and show us your collection of treasures.

So thank you to all of our followers on Pinterest. We know how much time and energy it takes to cultivate your interests and find something you want to follow. (Boy, do we know.) That you decide to spend that time with us means a lot to us here at Curio & Co., and we really appreciate it.

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