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Curio & Co. Product Catalog

The printing process


What is a giclée?

Glad you asked. A giclée is a high-quality, digitally-produced fine art print. The term was coined in 1991 by Jack Duganne at Nash Editions to distinguish archival-quality prints from the utilitarian proofs of standard inkjet printers.

The image is generated from high-resolution digital scans of the original and allows for the incredibly detailed prints seen in museums and galleries. A giclée provides better color accuracy than any other type of reproduction, and has all the tonalities and hues of the original work.


Paper as good as money

Our giclées are printed on cotton paper (otherwise known as ‘rag paper’). Cotton paper is stronger and more durable than wood pulp paper, and resists fading, discoloration or deterioration, so it’s used for important documents and archival-quality artwork. Cotton paper is what they use to print money – which just goes to show what a good investment it is. (If it’s good enough for the National Treasury, it’s good enough for us.)

Our paper comes from Hahnemühle FineArt GmbH, which has been manufacturing paper since 1584. Their paper is made with pure spring water and high-grade cotton, and traditional recipes are still used to make paper for painters, illustrators, bookbinders, and of course, Curio & Co.


Pigments to last

Special artwork and special paper requires special ink. Our giclées use pigment inks, rather than the standard dye-based inks used in regular printers. Pigment inks provide better image stability and last longer and than any other method. Since the pigment doesn’t dissolve completely and soak into the paper the way that dye-based inks do, pigment inks are more water resistant and won’t bleed at the edges of an image. What’s more, because pigment molecules stack themselves on top of the paper, it’s harder for sunlight or chemicals to react with the pigment molecules – making the image highly resistant to fading.

For all of this, of course, pigment inks are more expensive than dye-based inks, but when protected from air and sunlight, these inks will last many, many years. And when something looks this good, you want to keep it around.


Oberpfaffendorfer - Neptune Nibbles - Illustrated mermaid vintage poster ad for fish sticks (circa 1910's) - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Neptune Nibbles

Oberpfaffendorfer

The fish sticks sold by Oberpfaffendorfer in the early 1900s were very different from the...

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, Apr 14, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

What makes a TV personality?

Curio & Co. takes a look at what makes a TV personality different from other celebrities - retro photo of 1950s woman looking at a magazine with a vintage TV showing Art Linkletter's classic tv show Kids Say the Darndest Things. Curio and Co. OG. www.curioandco.com 

There are plenty of people famous for rather dubious talents on television, with “nice guy” perhaps the most dubious.

With the recent news that Stephen Colbert will be taking over when David Letterman retires next year, we’ve been thinking a lot about the backgrounds of TV celebrities. Although he started his career as a newscaster, Letterman caught the attention of the studios through his stand-up comedy. His successor Colbert also has a background in comedy, having got his big break with Chicago improve troop The Second City.

While most late night hosts share similar backgrounds, there are plenty of daytime hosts with more dubious histories. Some of them are journalists, certainly, but many blur the line between “famous on television” and simply being (thanks to reality TV) “famous for being on television.” Celebrity rosters filled with “reality stars” is kind of a recent phenomenon, but television (and radio before that) has always given us celebrities we didn’t quite know how to categorize – we called them “personalities.”

TV personalities sometimes hosted or presented shows, such as Bob Barker, Chuck Woolery or Dick Clark. But many were famous simply for being charming, witty and good sports, like Ed McMahon or Shadoe Stevens (from the center square).

Art Linkletter is one TV personality who parlayed his good-naturedness into an interesting career. He started rather straight-forwardly in radio (KGB in San Diego) doing some acting but mostly presenting programs. His most well-known programs – Kids Say the Darndest Things and People are Funny – started on radio and continued on television, even expanding into books and comics. Known for his approachable demeanor and his witty repartee, Linkletter made his personality a household name, even licensing his name and likeness to Milton Bradley to endorse their ‘Game of Life’. (Does your version in the family game closet have his picture on the money? Ours does.)

Since it’s being reported that Stephen Colbert will leave his larger than life fictional persona behind when he moves to network television, it’s hard to know what to expect from him as a real-world host. Perhaps he too will make the time-honored transition from comedian to simply, “personality.”

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