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Curio & Co. Product Catalog

The printing process


What is a giclée?

Glad you asked. A giclée is a high-quality, digitally-produced fine art print. The term was coined in 1991 by Jack Duganne at Nash Editions to distinguish archival-quality prints from the utilitarian proofs of standard inkjet printers.

The image is generated from high-resolution digital scans of the original and allows for the incredibly detailed prints seen in museums and galleries. A giclée provides better color accuracy than any other type of reproduction, and has all the tonalities and hues of the original work.


Paper as good as money

Our giclées are printed on cotton paper (otherwise known as ‘rag paper’). Cotton paper is stronger and more durable than wood pulp paper, and resists fading, discoloration or deterioration, so it’s used for important documents and archival-quality artwork. Cotton paper is what they use to print money – which just goes to show what a good investment it is. (If it’s good enough for the National Treasury, it’s good enough for us.)

Our paper comes from Hahnemühle FineArt GmbH, which has been manufacturing paper since 1584. Their paper is made with pure spring water and high-grade cotton, and traditional recipes are still used to make paper for painters, illustrators, bookbinders, and of course, Curio & Co.


Pigments to last

Special artwork and special paper requires special ink. Our giclées use pigment inks, rather than the standard dye-based inks used in regular printers. Pigment inks provide better image stability and last longer and than any other method. Since the pigment doesn’t dissolve completely and soak into the paper the way that dye-based inks do, pigment inks are more water resistant and won’t bleed at the edges of an image. What’s more, because pigment molecules stack themselves on top of the paper, it’s harder for sunlight or chemicals to react with the pigment molecules – making the image highly resistant to fading.

For all of this, of course, pigment inks are more expensive than dye-based inks, but when protected from air and sunlight, these inks will last many, many years. And when something looks this good, you want to keep it around.


Oberpfaffendorfer - Croquettes - Vintage poster ad with anthropomorphic croquettes (circa 1940's) for frozen croquettes - "We are a mouth full" - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Croquettes

Oberpfaffendorfer

The television commercial made in the 1950s for Oberpfaffendorfer’s croquettes is adorable. The animated croquettes...

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, Dec 18, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

It’s still story time

Curio & Co. looks at the power of storytelling and the joy of having books read to you. Image from classic comic strip Frank and His Friend, courtesy of Curio and Co. www.curioandco.com

Who says that only kids get to have stories read to them?

I used to think that audio books were only for blind people or truck drivers. Once you’d graduated to reading on your own, I thought, story time was over. I’m so glad I finally saw – well, heard – the light.

One holiday many years ago, an audio book-loving friend gave me an audio book of a Christmas Carol, and although I’d never listened to audio books, I figured that it might be something to listen to while curled up in front of the fire or putting together puzzles after the presents had all been opened. And what a treat it turned out to be. I was hooked.

There are plenty of benefits to audio books. They free up your hands, and allow you to move around – maybe taking on household chores or completing a puzzle. They can be enjoyed by many people at the same time and audio books unplug everyone from staring at a screen – which we could all use more of.

Best of all though, audio books take you right back to childhood, with the comfort and warmth of having someone read you a story. You can even hear the same story over and over, and never get any complaints.

With everything, quality is king, and some stories just aren’t written to be read aloud. Too pensive, too action-packed, too much description and you might be better off with a paperback. But get the right story – and the right reader (Stephen Pacey, every time) – and you’re in for a good time.

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