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Curio & Co. Product Catalog

The printing process


What is a giclée?

Glad you asked. A giclée is a high-quality, digitally-produced fine art print. The term was coined in 1991 by Jack Duganne at Nash Editions to distinguish archival-quality prints from the utilitarian proofs of standard inkjet printers.

The image is generated from high-resolution digital scans of the original and allows for the incredibly detailed prints seen in museums and galleries. A giclée provides better color accuracy than any other type of reproduction, and has all the tonalities and hues of the original work.


Paper as good as money

Our giclées are printed on cotton paper (otherwise known as ‘rag paper’). Cotton paper is stronger and more durable than wood pulp paper, and resists fading, discoloration or deterioration, so it’s used for important documents and archival-quality artwork. Cotton paper is what they use to print money – which just goes to show what a good investment it is. (If it’s good enough for the National Treasury, it’s good enough for us.)

Our paper comes from Hahnemühle FineArt GmbH, which has been manufacturing paper since 1584. Their paper is made with pure spring water and high-grade cotton, and traditional recipes are still used to make paper for painters, illustrators, bookbinders, and of course, Curio & Co.


Pigments to last

Special artwork and special paper requires special ink. Our giclées use pigment inks, rather than the standard dye-based inks used in regular printers. Pigment inks provide better image stability and last longer and than any other method. Since the pigment doesn’t dissolve completely and soak into the paper the way that dye-based inks do, pigment inks are more water resistant and won’t bleed at the edges of an image. What’s more, because pigment molecules stack themselves on top of the paper, it’s harder for sunlight or chemicals to react with the pigment molecules – making the image highly resistant to fading.

For all of this, of course, pigment inks are more expensive than dye-based inks, but when protected from air and sunlight, these inks will last many, many years. And when something looks this good, you want to keep it around.


Oberpfaffendorfer - Ambrosia Apple Juice - Illustrated vintage ad poster with girl in dirndl picking apples (circa 1950's - 1960's) - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Ambrosia Apple Juice

Oberpfaffendorfer

In Greek Mythology, ambrosia is the nectar of the goods, conferring immortality upon whoever drinks...

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, Aug 25, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Summertime Treats: Cotton Candy

Curio & Co. looks at nostalgia for summertime treats from childhood with cotton candy. Image of children very excited to be served cotton candy. Source, Heinz Family Fund/Carnegie Museum of Art. www.curioandco.com

Nostalgia at its stickiest.

Cotton Candy is a delightful summertime treat, and one that seems to sum up a lot of summer experiences. From a distance, it’s big and bold and commands a lot of attention – the same way summer vacations loom large in our anticipation and are the subjects of so many of our daydreams. It is available at so many summer destinations and it’s perfect for sharing. But alas, just like summer trips to the beach or summer tans or even a summer fling, the cotton candy melts away too soon and you’re left with air where your summer dreams once were.

Spun sugar, the precursor to cotton candy, was high class when it first appeared in Europe in the 18th century. It was spun by hand back then and was so labor intensive that it wasn’t available to us common folks. However, once machine-spun cotton candy was invented in 1897 – by a dentist no less – wider audiences got a taste of the sweet stuff.

At the St. Louis World’s Fair where cotton candy was first introduced in 1904, a box of the stuff (then called fairy floss) cost nearly half the price of admission to the fair itself. Today you can find cotton candy at county fairs, circus tents, amusement parks and vendors along the boardwalk in a variety of colors. And sure, you’re just eating pure sugar, but it’s far less sugar than a soft drink, so as summertime treats go, it’s not that bad.

Cotton candy contains summer magic. How else can you explain that it looks like cotton wool but melts on your tongue like a snowflake?

Image:Heinz Family Fund/Carnegie Museum of Art

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