Curio & Co. Product Catalog

The printing process


What is a giclée?

Glad you asked. A giclée is a high-quality, digitally-produced fine art print. The term was coined in 1991 by Jack Duganne at Nash Editions to distinguish archival-quality prints from the utilitarian proofs of standard inkjet printers.

The image is generated from high-resolution digital scans of the original and allows for the incredibly detailed prints seen in museums and galleries. A giclée provides better color accuracy than any other type of reproduction, and has all the tonalities and hues of the original work.


Paper as good as money

Our giclées are printed on cotton paper (otherwise known as ‘rag paper’). Cotton paper is stronger and more durable than wood pulp paper, and resists fading, discoloration or deterioration, so it’s used for important documents and archival-quality artwork. Cotton paper is what they use to print money – which just goes to show what a good investment it is. (If it’s good enough for the National Treasury, it’s good enough for us.)

Our paper comes from Hahnemühle FineArt GmbH, which has been manufacturing paper since 1584. Their paper is made with pure spring water and high-grade cotton, and traditional recipes are still used to make paper for painters, illustrators, bookbinders, and of course, Curio & Co.


Pigments to last

Special artwork and special paper requires special ink. Our giclées use pigment inks, rather than the standard dye-based inks used in regular printers. Pigment inks provide better image stability and last longer and than any other method. Since the pigment doesn’t dissolve completely and soak into the paper the way that dye-based inks do, pigment inks are more water resistant and won’t bleed at the edges of an image. What’s more, because pigment molecules stack themselves on top of the paper, it’s harder for sunlight or chemicals to react with the pigment molecules – making the image highly resistant to fading.

For all of this, of course, pigment inks are more expensive than dye-based inks, but when protected from air and sunlight, these inks will last many, many years. And when something looks this good, you want to keep it around.


Roger Believe - Invitation from the Subconscious (L'Invito Di Subconscio) - Illustrated comic book cover of Roger seeing a skeletal self reflected in the mirror (circa 1980's) for an adventure in the vain of Dylan Dog and Martin Mystery - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Invitation from the Subconscious (L'Invito ...

Roger Believe

This giclée of the 1986 Roger Believe cover of Invitation from the Subconscious (L'Invito Di...

view article
49.00 EUR
line
, Aug 26, 2015
by Ned Wazowski

What makes packaging work

 Curio & Co. looks at how to make packaging work. Image of package design for Musterberg Deck of Tarot Cards, courtesy of Curio and Co. www.curioandco.com

When thinking outside the box just isn’t enough

Packaging designers, like burlesque performers, know that pulling off the wrapping as fast as possible isn’t always ideal.

Good packaging can help tell a story. Not only does it provide ample space to squeeze in a little more information about the product or company, but the process of opening a package can tell you how the company wants you to think about the product in general.

Take Apple products as an example. Each Apple product comes with multiple layers of packaging which gives you more to open. This way you feel as if there is more to the product and that you’re getting more for your money. A little manipulative, perhaps, but these stages also help build anticipation so that your appreciation of the product is greater once you have it in your hands. And in an industry where customers are primed to want disposable novelties, helping your customers appreciate what they’ve got sounds great.

However, the materials used in the packaging play just as big a role in developing feelings of appreciation for and value of the product. Those plastic ‘clam-shell’ style packages that take forever to open are not just frustrating, but really don’t feel good in your hands. The slick plastic is hard to grab and painfully sharp if you do manage to get it open. Plus, the fact that it’s so often molded to the shape of the product itself means that it seems like you’re holding it in your hands, but you just can’t get it – which obviously adds to the frustration. However, packages using materials that are more pleasing to the touch – textured paper or soft fabric – give us a better emotional connection to the product and make the actual opening of it more enjoyable and memorable over all.

Putting together the packaging for our reproduction of the Musterberg Tarot Deck, our main interest was in creating something that was archival-quality so that collectors could enjoy it for years to come. So we went with acid-free Munken Pure paper – the same paper used for the cards themselves. The paper is strong but light, so you won’t feel like you’re holding a brick, but rather something that you’d want to pick up again and again. To further protect the box, the paper was coated with a kind of cellophane to ensure the box would hold up to handling, but with a softness that you really will want to touch. The result is downright cuddly. (Seriously, why don’t all paper products use this?)

The best packaging is probably the kind you never get rid of. I know I’ve got a few packages that remain on the shelf although their innards are long gone. In the case of the Musterberg Tarot Deck, we hope you don’t lose the cards. But even if you do, we’re pretty proud of the box.

view article
line



line