Curio & Co. Product Catalog

The printing process

What is a giclée?

Glad you asked. A giclée is a high-quality, digitally-produced fine art print. The term was coined in 1991 by Jack Duganne at Nash Editions to distinguish archival-quality prints from the utilitarian proofs of standard inkjet printers.

The image is generated from high-resolution digital scans of the original and allows for the incredibly detailed prints seen in museums and galleries. A giclée provides better color accuracy than any other type of reproduction, and has all the tonalities and hues of the original work.

Paper as good as money

Our giclées are printed on cotton paper (otherwise known as ‘rag paper’). Cotton paper is stronger and more durable than wood pulp paper, and resists fading, discoloration or deterioration, so it’s used for important documents and archival-quality artwork. Cotton paper is what they use to print money – which just goes to show what a good investment it is. (If it’s good enough for the National Treasury, it’s good enough for us.)

Our paper comes from Hahnemühle FineArt GmbH, which has been manufacturing paper since 1584. Their paper is made with pure spring water and high-grade cotton, and traditional recipes are still used to make paper for painters, illustrators, bookbinders, and of course, Curio & Co.

Pigments to last

Special artwork and special paper requires special ink. Our giclées use pigment inks, rather than the standard dye-based inks used in regular printers. Pigment inks provide better image stability and last longer and than any other method. Since the pigment doesn’t dissolve completely and soak into the paper the way that dye-based inks do, pigment inks are more water resistant and won’t bleed at the edges of an image. What’s more, because pigment molecules stack themselves on top of the paper, it’s harder for sunlight or chemicals to react with the pigment molecules – making the image highly resistant to fading.

For all of this, of course, pigment inks are more expensive than dye-based inks, but when protected from air and sunlight, these inks will last many, many years. And when something looks this good, you want to keep it around.

Bunchy - They All Want... Bunchy - Illustrated vintage magazine ad of open Bunchy Cola, multiple bottle caps and bottle opener (circa 1950's) - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG)

They All Want... Bunchy


When my Mom was little, they kept all of their Bunchy bottle caps in an...

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49.95 EUR
, Sep 09, 2015
by Ned Wazowski

Curio & Co. on display

Curio & Co. featured in a new exhibition at Atelier Olschinsky in Vienna, Austria

A new exhibition looks at the playful side of our collections.

Come see Curio & Co. up close and on the walls in a new exhibition at the Atelier Olschinsky Art Store in Vienna.

Titled ‘Let’s Play,’ the exhibition will look back at the last six years in Curio & Co. history. All your favorites will be represented – from Frank and His Friend to Spaceman Jax, from vintage ads to vintage time machines, and plenty of surprises and never-before-seen pieces.

Plus, the exhibition will include an in-depth look at our latest project: The Tarot of Musterberg. The complete deck will be on display, as well as larger-than-life versions of our favorite cards that are sure to deal up fun and fantasy.

Prints of many of the items on display will be for sale at the gallery as well as on their art store website.

Previous shows at the gallery have featured really terrific artists, and we’re honored to be included in that group. From digital landscapes to imaginative topography, each artist brings a wide rage of variety to the gallery. And what you can always expect from Atelier Olschinsky is impeccable craftsmanship and attention to detail.

We’ll be there for the opening, enjoying the trip down memory lane – looking at past projects and how far we’ve come, celebrating the completion of the present project and looking ahead to see where we might go next. If you’re in Vienna, please stop by and join us: Let’s Play!

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