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The printing process


What is a giclée?

Glad you asked. A giclée is a high-quality, digitally-produced fine art print. The term was coined in 1991 by Jack Duganne at Nash Editions to distinguish archival-quality prints from the utilitarian proofs of standard inkjet printers.

The image is generated from high-resolution digital scans of the original and allows for the incredibly detailed prints seen in museums and galleries. A giclée provides better color accuracy than any other type of reproduction, and has all the tonalities and hues of the original work.


Paper as good as money

Our giclées are printed on cotton paper (otherwise known as ‘rag paper’). Cotton paper is stronger and more durable than wood pulp paper, and resists fading, discoloration or deterioration, so it’s used for important documents and archival-quality artwork. Cotton paper is what they use to print money – which just goes to show what a good investment it is. (If it’s good enough for the National Treasury, it’s good enough for us.)

Our paper comes from Hahnemühle FineArt GmbH, which has been manufacturing paper since 1584. Their paper is made with pure spring water and high-grade cotton, and traditional recipes are still used to make paper for painters, illustrators, bookbinders, and of course, Curio & Co.


Pigments to last

Special artwork and special paper requires special ink. Our giclées use pigment inks, rather than the standard dye-based inks used in regular printers. Pigment inks provide better image stability and last longer and than any other method. Since the pigment doesn’t dissolve completely and soak into the paper the way that dye-based inks do, pigment inks are more water resistant and won’t bleed at the edges of an image. What’s more, because pigment molecules stack themselves on top of the paper, it’s harder for sunlight or chemicals to react with the pigment molecules – making the image highly resistant to fading.

For all of this, of course, pigment inks are more expensive than dye-based inks, but when protected from air and sunlight, these inks will last many, many years. And when something looks this good, you want to keep it around.


Spaceman Jax - Spaceman Jax - Through the Mantagon Minefield - comic book cover - Spaceman Jax - Ringer Comics - Silver Age comic book - issue one - Humor - Retro design - Curio & Co. - www.curioandco.com - Jax, Dekkin and Mantagon on conver  - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Spaceman Jax - Through the Mantagon Minefield

Spaceman Jax

Pre-order this real gem from the Silver Age of Comic at a pre-order bargain price...

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, Sep 09, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Summertime Treats: Corn Dogs

Curio & Co. looks at the history of favorite summertime treat the corn dog. Image from Curio and Co. of an ad for the Cozy Dog Drive-In, the birthplace of the corn dog. www.curioandco.com

When you’re ready to grab life by the handle.

I’m not really sure why so many treats we enjoy in the summer are so greasy – hamburgers on the grill, funnel cake, chili cheese fries at the ballgame. You’d think that with the hot temperatures summer days can bring, we’d want something a little easier on our stomachs. But, I guess the heart wants what it wants. And my heart (or stomach, I guess) wants corn dogs in the summer.

A corn dog is simple enough: a hot dog, dipped in cornmeal batter and deep-fried on a stick. But tracing the history of this summertime treat is a lot more complicated. At least twenty people across the US are credited with inventing the corn dog. As early as 1910 you could buy a Krusty Korn Sausage Pan for baking your own corn dogs at home. Back then it was served without a stick and was cut into slices. In 1946, Hot Dog on a Stick opened at Muscle Beach in Santa Monica, California, and by the 1950s and 1960s corn dogs were everywhere.

With their handy stick, corn dogs are perfect for summer venues like county or state fairs, amusement parks or boardwalks – anyplace where you might want a snack while you stroll around. So naturally, corn dogs come to mind whenever I think of summer vacation. Summer just seems to be a time when you want to relax the rules and take things a little easier. Going barefoot, sleeping under the stars, eating out on a picnic blanket instead of at the table. And like an ice cream cone, corn dogs release you from the necessity of a plate and allow for more freedom with your meals.

Some people eat them with ketchup, some with mustard, and some with both. The Arizona Diamondbacks serve a $25 version at their stadiums that’s a foot long and stuffed with bacon and cheese. However you like it, a corn dog is one snack that’s really got a handle on summer.

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