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, Nov 18, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Spaceman Jax today

Curio and Co. looks at how Spaceman Jax might be handled by a studio today. Comic panel from classic 1960s animated TV show Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures as he appeared in the pages of Ringer Comics. Image from Curio & Co. www.curioandco.com.

What would the Spaceman Jax character be like done by a studio today?

If Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures were back on TV today, I’d love to see a really faithful adaptation. Sure, they’d need to update the animation, and I could see Jax rendered in CG with flashy animation, but I’d hope that they’d keep the mood of the original and especially the personality of Jax. Because Spaceman Jax isn’t really cool, and it would be awful to see a studio turn him into a backwards baseball cap-wearing, texting and social media type.

What makes Jax so great is that he has aligned himself with classic heroes of the past and set himself apart from his peers. He is out of touch, in more ways than one, and this would be critical in any new version of the show.

In fact, what would Spaceman Jax do with social media? I could see him enjoying Twitter, but being lost on Facebook. Twitter is so one-directional and that would suit his single-mindedness really well, He would send out his messages of courage and idealism, never really knowing whether they were read or not, but assuming that many would want to follow his exploits – and of course, we do. I think that the back and forth and the sharing of Facebook wouldn’t interest him as much, and he would get caught up in more of the narcissistic sides of Facebook. Plus, how would he “like” justice or bravery?

 


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, Oct 30, 2014
by Louis Smeedly

Happy Halloween

ghost drawing (graphite on paper) by Cesare Asaro, Happy Halloween by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG - www.curioandco.com)

We wanted to take five and wish you all happy trick or treating a very scary Halloween.

– BOO! 

 


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, Sep 24, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Don’t change that channel

Curio & Co. looks at the power of a TV marathon, image of Spaceman Jax animation cell from 1960s classic animated series Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures. www.curioandco.com

Everything comes to a halt for a TV marathon

When I was a kid TV marathons were an annual event. Every year some TV station would show a day’s worth of Elvis movies on his birthday, monster movies in the lead up to Halloween, and all the Rankin and Bass claymation Christmas specials seemed to run in a continuous loop throughout the holiday season. Needless to say, my TV calendar was full the whole year long.

However, my favorite TV marathon was the weekend of Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures cartoons that the local station showed late in the summer. Looking back, I don’t know if they showed them in order or even if they showed all of the episodes, but I always felt that if you missed one you would “interrupt the flow” and miss out on something. So to prepare, I made snacks in advance and diligently did all of my chores ahead of time to be sure that I’d never have to leave the couch. (My parents, I should say, were very understanding and maybe just the tiniest bit glad to get me out of their hair for a weekend.)

We didn’t call it binge-watching back then, maybe because we felt it was beyond our control – and when you’re rushing to take a shower in the time it takes for a commercial break, you really do feel at the mercy of someone else. But I suppose the TV marathon of the past is the same today. It might not seem like such an impossibly big event today, since watching endless episodes back-to-back is so much easier to do, with online streaming on demand and the ability to press pause. Is binge-watching today as much fun as the TV marathons I enjoyed as a kid? If I can still spend a weekend on the couch watching Spaceman Jax cartoons, I guess I don’t care what you call it.


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Roger Believe - Restoration by Night (Restauro Notturno) - Illustrated comic book cover of learking face and Roger with smoking revolver (circa 1980's) for an adventure in the vain of Dylan Dog and Martin Mystery - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Restoration by Night (Restauro Notturno)

Roger Believe

This giclée of the 1986 Roger Believe cover of Restoration by Night (Restauro Notturno) is...

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