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, Sep 24, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Don’t change that channel

Curio & Co. looks at the power of a TV marathon, image of Spaceman Jax animation cell from 1960s classic animated series Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures. www.curioandco.com

Everything comes to a halt for a TV marathon

When I was a kid TV marathons were an annual event. Every year some TV station would show a day’s worth of Elvis movies on his birthday, monster movies in the lead up to Halloween, and all the Rankin and Bass claymation Christmas specials seemed to run in a continuous loop throughout the holiday season. Needless to say, my TV calendar was full the whole year long.

However, my favorite TV marathon was the weekend of Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures cartoons that the local station showed late in the summer. Looking back, I don’t know if they showed them in order or even if they showed all of the episodes, but I always felt that if you missed one you would “interrupt the flow” and miss out on something. So to prepare, I made snacks in advance and diligently did all of my chores ahead of time to be sure that I’d never have to leave the couch. (My parents, I should say, were very understanding and maybe just the tiniest bit glad to get me out of their hair for a weekend.)

We didn’t call it binge-watching back then, maybe because we felt it was beyond our control – and when you’re rushing to take a shower in the time it takes for a commercial break, you really do feel at the mercy of someone else. But I suppose the TV marathon of the past is the same today. It might not seem like such an impossibly big event today, since watching endless episodes back-to-back is so much easier to do, with online streaming on demand and the ability to press pause. Is binge-watching today as much fun as the TV marathons I enjoyed as a kid? If I can still spend a weekend on the couch watching Spaceman Jax cartoons, I guess I don’t care what you call it.


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, Sep 09, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Summertime Treats: Corn Dogs

Curio & Co. looks at the history of favorite summertime treat the corn dog. Image from Curio and Co. of an ad for the Cozy Dog Drive-In, the birthplace of the corn dog. www.curioandco.com

When you’re ready to grab life by the handle.

I’m not really sure why so many treats we enjoy in the summer are so greasy – hamburgers on the grill, funnel cake, chili cheese fries at the ballgame. You’d think that with the hot temperatures summer days can bring, we’d want something a little easier on our stomachs. But, I guess the heart wants what it wants. And my heart (or stomach, I guess) wants corn dogs in the summer.

A corn dog is simple enough: a hot dog, dipped in cornmeal batter and deep-fried on a stick. But tracing the history of this summertime treat is a lot more complicated. At least twenty people across the US are credited with inventing the corn dog. As early as 1910 you could buy a Krusty Korn Sausage Pan for baking your own corn dogs at home. Back then it was served without a stick and was cut into slices. In 1946, Hot Dog on a Stick opened at Muscle Beach in Santa Monica, California, and by the 1950s and 1960s corn dogs were everywhere.

With their handy stick, corn dogs are perfect for summer venues like county or state fairs, amusement parks or boardwalks – anyplace where you might want a snack while you stroll around. So naturally, corn dogs come to mind whenever I think of summer vacation. Summer just seems to be a time when you want to relax the rules and take things a little easier. Going barefoot, sleeping under the stars, eating out on a picnic blanket instead of at the table. And like an ice cream cone, corn dogs release you from the necessity of a plate and allow for more freedom with your meals.

Some people eat them with ketchup, some with mustard, and some with both. The Arizona Diamondbacks serve a $25 version at their stadiums that’s a foot long and stuffed with bacon and cheese. However you like it, a corn dog is one snack that’s really got a handle on summer.


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, Sep 01, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Summer Cinema: Jaws, 1975

Curio & Co. looks at classic summer blockbuster Jaws which offers quite a few reasons not to worry about skipping the beach. www.curioandco.com

Maybe skip the water altogether this weekend.

There’s nothing worse than working while everyone else is away on vacation. Not only are you picking up the slack for your coworkers, but some have the nerve to send those “Wish you were here” postcards back to the office just to rub your nose in it. But don’t let sour grapes ruin your day. Maybe all you need is a reminder that beach vacations aren’t all they’re cracked up to be. Jaws will help you feel better about skipping the beach.

From the beginning, Jaws was set to attack. The book by Peter Benchley generated a lot of early attention, and the film rights were purchased even before it was published in 1974. By the time the film came out in the summer of 1975, the book had sold over five and a half million copies, and the film would later go on to become the highest grossing film in history to that point. But from the beginning of the production, the film was in deep water.

Producers chose a 26-year-old director who was coming off the success of his first feature film. However, Steven Spielberg was naïve enough to eschew filming outdoor scenes in a Hollywood tank, opting instead for the waters off Martha’s Vineyard. Shooting on the ocean caused numerous problems, not the least of which was a ship that starting sinking with all three primary cast members on board. Trouble extended to everything in the water, too. The film’s extensive effects and expensive sharks pushed the film way over budget, especially as the three sharks built were constantly malfunctioning. The crew go to calling the production “Flaws” after the problematic mechanical sharks (one of which sank on its first day in the water).

Furthermore, filming began without a complete script, since Spielberg was unhappy with the first two acts of the book and the film was still being rewritten on location. Each scene was finished the night before it was to be shot, with cast and crew not exactly sure what to expect for the next day’s filming. What’s more, actor Robert Shaw who played the film’s shark hunter would fly to Canada as soon as his scenes were shot, in order to avoid the US tax authorities, but when he was on set he spent most of his time drinking and arguing with Richard Dreyfuss.

All of these problems caused the film to get way, way behind schedule: They were scheduled for 55 days of shooting, but finally wrapped after 159 days. Forget the shark, the studio must have been out for blood!

There seems to have been a silver lining to all of this, however, and some of these problems might have made for a better film. Spielberg’s insistence on shooting on location rather than a tank made all the difference in the overall quality of the film, with the scenes on the water especially naturalistic and believable. Problems with the shark meant that the mechanical props had to sometimes be done away with altogether, and attack scenes show from the shark’s perspective instead. Film critics agree that this technique is what makes the film so suspenseful and the reason the film’s popularity is so enduring. Finally, rewriting the script on set meant it was possible for many people to collaborate, and the film’s most famous line (“You’re going to need a bigger boat”) was contributed by actor Roy Scheider.

Still, as good as the film is, Jaws does not make you want to rush out and book a beach holiday. Overall beach attendance was down in 1975, and I think it’s fair to attribute some of that to people who saw the film. So when it seems like everyone else is away on vacation and you’re stuck at the office, Jaws might just make you feel better about being on dry land.

Did you know? The crew nicknamed the shark “Bruce” after the name of Spielberg’s lawyer.


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Oberpfaffendorfer - OJ Nectar - Vintage poster ad with bird drinking orange juice (circa 1910's) - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

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Oberpfaffendorfer

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