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     About Us

Curio & Co. understands collecting and collectors.  Each of us can recall that first childhood treasure – a smashed penny, a toy from the bottom of the cereal box, a rubber band with “You’re the bestest” written on it by Jenny McKenzie – and we remember feeling “this is so special that I have to keep it forever.”  So we did.

We know that memories have powers so strong they can take you back to a specific time and place in your life that you can live over and over again.  And sharing those memories with others can be just as powerful.  Mr. Druthers remembers his Great Grandfather – who worked at Curio & Co. side by side with his father – bringing out a collection of matchbooks collected from travels around the world.  “Listening to his stories of those matchbooks; well I was right there with him…in places I’d never even seen.”

All of us at Curio & Co. are honored to help you build your collection of memories – to rediscover your own childhood treasures and share in some of our favorite memories of places you might not have seen yet.

Team Members

  • Elmer Druthers
    CEO

    Mr. Druthers continues to uphold the family traditions of excellence and dedication to high-quality merchandise and that have made Curio & Co. great for the past four generations.

  • Margie Trundleberry
    Office Manager

    Margie really runs the show around here, and we just couldn’t manage anything without her.  And we’re not just saying that because she’s looking over our shoulder right now as we write this.  Honestly.

  • Jay Laramie
    Head of Acquisitions

    Jay’s work tracking down all of our one-of-a-kind collectibles brings him to some unusual places (with unusual expense reports), but buying Rex Ensemble tour posters for a living?  Lucky devil.

  • Louis Smeedley
    Head of Archives

    Louis and his team in Archives and Restoration ensure that the next generation gets the same chance to drool over Darnell Duffy’s work or hold a Star Cowboy Blaster in their hands.  (Louis would prefer gloved hands, but we just can’t help it.)

  • Shirley Dinn
    Head of Sales

    Shirley’s job is both the most exciting, and the hardest.  Bringing you the coolest products from entertainment memorabilia makes us so happy.  But letting go of it is really difficult.

  • Ned Wazowski
    Head of Research

    We sometimes forget that Ned doesn’t know everything.  Math, freeways and chili recipes confound him.  But for anything else you might need to know, Ned’s got the information.


Oberpfaffendorfer - Bite into Sweety - Illustrated vintage poster ad with young girls teasing young boy with Sweety chocolate bar (circa 1920's) - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Bite into Sweety

Oberpfaffendorfer

Grandparents always have the best chocolates. And you never have to beg – they’re always...

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, Sep 01, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Summer Cinema: Jaws, 1975

Curio & Co. looks at classic summer blockbuster Jaws which offers quite a few reasons not to worry about skipping the beach. www.curioandco.com

Maybe skip the water altogether this weekend.

There’s nothing worse than working while everyone else is away on vacation. Not only are you picking up the slack for your coworkers, but some have the nerve to send those “Wish you were here” postcards back to the office just to rub your nose in it. But don’t let sour grapes ruin your day. Maybe all you need is a reminder that beach vacations aren’t all they’re cracked up to be. Jaws will help you feel better about skipping the beach.

From the beginning, Jaws was set to attack. The book by Peter Benchley generated a lot of early attention, and the film rights were purchased even before it was published in 1974. By the time the film came out in the summer of 1975, the book had sold over five and a half million copies, and the film would later go on to become the highest grossing film in history to that point. But from the beginning of the production, the film was in deep water.

Producers chose a 26-year-old director who was coming off the success of his first feature film. However, Steven Spielberg was naïve enough to eschew filming outdoor scenes in a Hollywood tank, opting instead for the waters off Martha’s Vineyard. Shooting on the ocean caused numerous problems, not the least of which was a ship that starting sinking with all three primary cast members on board. Trouble extended to everything in the water, too. The film’s extensive effects and expensive sharks pushed the film way over budget, especially as the three sharks built were constantly malfunctioning. The crew go to calling the production “Flaws” after the problematic mechanical sharks (one of which sank on its first day in the water).

Furthermore, filming began without a complete script, since Spielberg was unhappy with the first two acts of the book and the film was still being rewritten on location. Each scene was finished the night before it was to be shot, with cast and crew not exactly sure what to expect for the next day’s filming. What’s more, actor Robert Shaw who played the film’s shark hunter would fly to Canada as soon as his scenes were shot, in order to avoid the US tax authorities, but when he was on set he spent most of his time drinking and arguing with Richard Dreyfuss.

All of these problems caused the film to get way, way behind schedule: They were scheduled for 55 days of shooting, but finally wrapped after 159 days. Forget the shark, the studio must have been out for blood!

There seems to have been a silver lining to all of this, however, and some of these problems might have made for a better film. Spielberg’s insistence on shooting on location rather than a tank made all the difference in the overall quality of the film, with the scenes on the water especially naturalistic and believable. Problems with the shark meant that the mechanical props had to sometimes be done away with altogether, and attack scenes show from the shark’s perspective instead. Film critics agree that this technique is what makes the film so suspenseful and the reason the film’s popularity is so enduring. Finally, rewriting the script on set meant it was possible for many people to collaborate, and the film’s most famous line (“You’re going to need a bigger boat”) was contributed by actor Roy Scheider.

Still, as good as the film is, Jaws does not make you want to rush out and book a beach holiday. Overall beach attendance was down in 1975, and I think it’s fair to attribute some of that to people who saw the film. So when it seems like everyone else is away on vacation and you’re stuck at the office, Jaws might just make you feel better about being on dry land.

Did you know? The crew nicknamed the shark “Bruce” after the name of Spielberg’s lawyer.

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