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     About Us

Curio & Co. understands collecting and collectors.  Each of us can recall that first childhood treasure – a smashed penny, a toy from the bottom of the cereal box, a rubber band with “You’re the bestest” written on it by Jenny McKenzie – and we remember feeling “this is so special that I have to keep it forever.”  So we did.

We know that memories have powers so strong they can take you back to a specific time and place in your life that you can live over and over again.  And sharing those memories with others can be just as powerful.  Mr. Druthers remembers his Great Grandfather – who worked at Curio & Co. side by side with his father – bringing out a collection of matchbooks collected from travels around the world.  “Listening to his stories of those matchbooks; well I was right there with him…in places I’d never even seen.”

All of us at Curio & Co. are honored to help you build your collection of memories – to rediscover your own childhood treasures and share in some of our favorite memories of places you might not have seen yet.

Team Members

  • Elmer Druthers
    CEO

    Mr. Druthers continues to uphold the family traditions of excellence and dedication to high-quality merchandise and that have made Curio & Co. great for the past four generations.

  • Margie Trundleberry
    Office Manager

    Margie really runs the show around here, and we just couldn’t manage anything without her.  And we’re not just saying that because she’s looking over our shoulder right now as we write this.  Honestly.

  • Jay Laramie
    Head of Acquisitions

    Jay’s work tracking down all of our one-of-a-kind collectibles brings him to some unusual places (with unusual expense reports), but buying Rex Ensemble tour posters for a living?  Lucky devil.

  • Louis Smeedley
    Head of Archives

    Louis and his team in Archives and Restoration ensure that the next generation gets the same chance to drool over Darnell Duffy’s work or hold a Star Cowboy Blaster in their hands.  (Louis would prefer gloved hands, but we just can’t help it.)

  • Shirley Dinn
    Head of Sales

    Shirley’s job is both the most exciting, and the hardest.  Bringing you the coolest products from entertainment memorabilia makes us so happy.  But letting go of it is really difficult.

  • Ned Wazowski
    Head of Research

    We sometimes forget that Ned doesn’t know everything.  Math, freeways and chili recipes confound him.  But for anything else you might need to know, Ned’s got the information.


Roger Believe - First Flight (Primo Volo) - Illustrated comic book cover of Roger and eagles through the clouds (circa 1980's) for an adventure in the vain of Dylan Dog and Martin Mystery - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

First Flight (Primo Volo)

Roger Believe

This giclée of the 1986 Roger Believe cover of First Flight (Primo Volo) is part...

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, Sep 24, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Don’t change that channel

Curio & Co. looks at the power of a TV marathon, image of Spaceman Jax animation cell from 1960s classic animated series Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures. www.curioandco.com

Everything comes to a halt for a TV marathon

When I was a kid TV marathons were an annual event. Every year some TV station would show a day’s worth of Elvis movies on his birthday, monster movies in the lead up to Halloween, and all the Rankin and Bass claymation Christmas specials seemed to run in a continuous loop throughout the holiday season. Needless to say, my TV calendar was full the whole year long.

However, my favorite TV marathon was the weekend of Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures cartoons that the local station showed late in the summer. Looking back, I don’t know if they showed them in order or even if they showed all of the episodes, but I always felt that if you missed one you would “interrupt the flow” and miss out on something. So to prepare, I made snacks in advance and diligently did all of my chores ahead of time to be sure that I’d never have to leave the couch. (My parents, I should say, were very understanding and maybe just the tiniest bit glad to get me out of their hair for a weekend.)

We didn’t call it binge-watching back then, maybe because we felt it was beyond our control – and when you’re rushing to take a shower in the time it takes for a commercial break, you really do feel at the mercy of someone else. But I suppose the TV marathon of the past is the same today. It might not seem like such an impossibly big event today, since watching endless episodes back-to-back is so much easier to do, with online streaming on demand and the ability to press pause. Is binge-watching today as much fun as the TV marathons I enjoyed as a kid? If I can still spend a weekend on the couch watching Spaceman Jax cartoons, I guess I don’t care what you call it.

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