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     About Us

Curio & Co. understands collecting and collectors.  Each of us can recall that first childhood treasure – a smashed penny, a toy from the bottom of the cereal box, a rubber band with “You’re the bestest” written on it by Jenny McKenzie – and we remember feeling “this is so special that I have to keep it forever.”  So we did.

We know that memories have powers so strong they can take you back to a specific time and place in your life that you can live over and over again.  And sharing those memories with others can be just as powerful.  Mr. Druthers remembers his Great Grandfather – who worked at Curio & Co. side by side with his father – bringing out a collection of matchbooks collected from travels around the world.  “Listening to his stories of those matchbooks; well I was right there with him…in places I’d never even seen.”

All of us at Curio & Co. are honored to help you build your collection of memories – to rediscover your own childhood treasures and share in some of our favorite memories of places you might not have seen yet.

Team Members

  • Elmer Druthers
    CEO

    Mr. Druthers continues to uphold the family traditions of excellence and dedication to high-quality merchandise and that have made Curio & Co. great for the past four generations.

  • Margie Trundleberry
    Office Manager

    Margie really runs the show around here, and we just couldn’t manage anything without her.  And we’re not just saying that because she’s looking over our shoulder right now as we write this.  Honestly.

  • Jay Laramie
    Head of Acquisitions

    Jay’s work tracking down all of our one-of-a-kind collectibles brings him to some unusual places (with unusual expense reports), but buying Rex Ensemble tour posters for a living?  Lucky devil.

  • Louis Smeedley
    Head of Archives

    Louis and his team in Archives and Restoration ensure that the next generation gets the same chance to drool over Darnell Duffy’s work or hold a Star Cowboy Blaster in their hands.  (Louis would prefer gloved hands, but we just can’t help it.)

  • Shirley Dinn
    Head of Sales

    Shirley’s job is both the most exciting, and the hardest.  Bringing you the coolest products from entertainment memorabilia makes us so happy.  But letting go of it is really difficult.

  • Ned Wazowski
    Head of Research

    We sometimes forget that Ned doesn’t know everything.  Math, freeways and chili recipes confound him.  But for anything else you might need to know, Ned’s got the information.


Oberpfaffendorfer - Glamour Roast - Illustrated vintage poster ad with flapper drinking coffee (circa 1920's) "Exotic Aroma" - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Glamour Roast

Oberpfaffendorfer

There’s nothing glamorous about Monday mornings. I guess if Mondays mean starting your trek through...

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, Aug 25, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Summertime Treats: Cotton Candy

Curio & Co. looks at nostalgia for summertime treats from childhood with cotton candy. Image of children very excited to be served cotton candy. Source, Heinz Family Fund/Carnegie Museum of Art. www.curioandco.com

Nostalgia at its stickiest.

Cotton Candy is a delightful summertime treat, and one that seems to sum up a lot of summer experiences. From a distance, it’s big and bold and commands a lot of attention – the same way summer vacations loom large in our anticipation and are the subjects of so many of our daydreams. It is available at so many summer destinations and it’s perfect for sharing. But alas, just like summer trips to the beach or summer tans or even a summer fling, the cotton candy melts away too soon and you’re left with air where your summer dreams once were.

Spun sugar, the precursor to cotton candy, was high class when it first appeared in Europe in the 18th century. It was spun by hand back then and was so labor intensive that it wasn’t available to us common folks. However, once machine-spun cotton candy was invented in 1897 – by a dentist no less – wider audiences got a taste of the sweet stuff.

At the St. Louis World’s Fair where cotton candy was first introduced in 1904, a box of the stuff (then called fairy floss) cost nearly half the price of admission to the fair itself. Today you can find cotton candy at county fairs, circus tents, amusement parks and vendors along the boardwalk in a variety of colors. And sure, you’re just eating pure sugar, but it’s far less sugar than a soft drink, so as summertime treats go, it’s not that bad.

Cotton candy contains summer magic. How else can you explain that it looks like cotton wool but melts on your tongue like a snowflake?

Image:Heinz Family Fund/Carnegie Museum of Art

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