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Cocoalicious


Oberpfaffendorfer - Cocoalicious - Illustrated vintage ad for hot coco and marshmallows served by elf (circa 1910's) - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

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49.95 EUR

Cocoalicious

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Oberpfaffendorfer made their special cocoa available only during the Christmas season. According to the company’s archives, distributors were required to send unsold packages back on December 26th. If there were any left that is.

It’s easy to see how it went so fast. With its strong robust flavor and its dark, rich chocolate, it must have seemed just the thing for Santa’s elves at the North Pole, let alone folks at home. Of course, it didn’t hurt that advertisers encouraged consumers to serve the cocoa in a huge bowl. No wonder there was never any left after Christmas.

You can keep this reproduction of the original 1912 “Cocoalicious – 25-Hour Blend” ad up all year round; there aren’t any rules now.

Each print carries an official Curio & Co. stamp and comes with an embossed Certificate of Authenticity. For more information on product materials, click here.

Who couldn’t use a bowl of cocoa so strong (and delicious), especially on a Monday morning?


General Details

Year: Reproduced in 2012 from 1912 original

Material: Giclée print

Paper: Hahnemühle museum quality acid-free paper

Size: 26.7 x 33.0 cm (10.5 x 13 in)

Image Size: 20.32 x 28.6 cm (8 x 11.25 in)

 

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Oberpfaffendorfer - Ambrosia Apple Juice - Illustrated vintage ad poster with girl in dirndl picking apples (circa 1950's - 1960's) - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Ambrosia Apple Juice

Oberpfaffendorfer

In Greek Mythology, ambrosia is the nectar of the goods, conferring immortality upon whoever drinks it – which is a...

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49.95 EUR
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Oberpfaffendorfer - Bite into Sweety - Illustrated vintage poster ad with young girls teasing young boy with Sweety chocolate bar (circa 1920's) - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Bite into Sweety

Oberpfaffendorfer

Grandparents always have the best chocolates. And you never have to beg – they’re always so happy to share with...

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49.95 EUR
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Oberpfaffendorfer - Cocoalicious - Illustrated vintage ad for hot coco and marshmallows served by elf (circa 1910's) - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Cocoalicious

Oberpfaffendorfer

Oberpfaffendorfer made their special cocoa available only during the Christmas season. According to the company’s archives, distributors were required to...

view article
49.95 EUR
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Oberpfaffendorfer - Croquettes - Vintage poster ad with anthropomorphic croquettes (circa 1940's) for frozen croquettes - "We are a mouth full" - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Croquettes

Oberpfaffendorfer

The television commercial made in the 1950s for Oberpfaffendorfer’s croquettes is adorable. The animated croquettes dance in a conga line...

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49.95 EUR
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Oberpfaffendorfer - Glamour Roast - Illustrated vintage poster ad with flapper drinking coffee (circa 1920's) "Exotic Aroma" - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Glamour Roast

Oberpfaffendorfer

There’s nothing glamorous about Monday mornings. I guess if Mondays mean starting your trek through the Himalayas or the launch...

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49.95 EUR
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Oberpfaffendorfer - Neptune Nibbles - Illustrated mermaid vintage poster ad for fish sticks (circa 1910's) - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Neptune Nibbles

Oberpfaffendorfer

The fish sticks sold by Oberpfaffendorfer in the early 1900s were very different from the breaded delight that we know...

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49.95 EUR
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Oberpfaffendorfer

Founded in the early 1900s, Oberpfaffendorfer is a family-run company manufacturing packaged foods. With roots in German-speaking Switzerland, the company is as known for its family loyalty as it is for its packaged “comfort food.” Oberpfaffendorfer fully embraced the frozen food market in the 1950s, and some of its popular products include Neptune Nibblets and its Croquettes. The company slogan, “We’re a mouthful!” plays on the company’s difficult-to-pronounce name, as well as its reputation for hearty food.

 


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, Aug 26, 2015
by Ned Wazowski

What makes packaging work

 Curio & Co. looks at how to make packaging work. Image of package design for Musterberg Deck of Tarot Cards, courtesy of Curio and Co. www.curioandco.com

When thinking outside the box just isn’t enough

Packaging designers, like burlesque performers, know that pulling off the wrapping as fast as possible isn’t always ideal.

Good packaging can help tell a story. Not only does it provide ample space to squeeze in a little more information about the product or company, but the process of opening a package can tell you how the company wants you to think about the product in general.

Take Apple products as an example. Each Apple product comes with multiple layers of packaging which gives you more to open. This way you feel as if there is more to the product and that you’re getting more for your money. A little manipulative, perhaps, but these stages also help build anticipation so that your appreciation of the product is greater once you have it in your hands. And in an industry where customers are primed to want disposable novelties, helping your customers appreciate what they’ve got sounds great.

However, the materials used in the packaging play just as big a role in developing feelings of appreciation for and value of the product. Those plastic ‘clam-shell’ style packages that take forever to open are not just frustrating, but really don’t feel good in your hands. The slick plastic is hard to grab and painfully sharp if you do manage to get it open. Plus, the fact that it’s so often molded to the shape of the product itself means that it seems like you’re holding it in your hands, but you just can’t get it – which obviously adds to the frustration. However, packages using materials that are more pleasing to the touch – textured paper or soft fabric – give us a better emotional connection to the product and make the actual opening of it more enjoyable and memorable over all.

Putting together the packaging for our reproduction of the Musterberg Tarot Deck, our main interest was in creating something that was archival-quality so that collectors could enjoy it for years to come. So we went with acid-free Munken Pure paper – the same paper used for the cards themselves. The paper is strong but light, so you won’t feel like you’re holding a brick, but rather something that you’d want to pick up again and again. To further protect the box, the paper was coated with a kind of cellophane to ensure the box would hold up to handling, but with a softness that you really will want to touch. The result is downright cuddly. (Seriously, why don’t all paper products use this?)

The best packaging is probably the kind you never get rid of. I know I’ve got a few packages that remain on the shelf although their innards are long gone. In the case of the Musterberg Tarot Deck, we hope you don’t lose the cards. But even if you do, we’re pretty proud of the box.

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, Aug 12, 2015
by Ned Wazowski

Time for a game night

Grab some friends and deal up some fun.

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, Aug 05, 2015
by Ned Wazowski

An ode to imperfections

In a digital world, “to err is human” is starting to mean a lot more.

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, Jul 29, 2015
by Ned Wazowski

The History of Tarot

Card reading (for fun and profit) has a long history, but maybe not as long as you think.

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, Jul 22, 2015
by Ned Wazowski

Bringing back postcards

Nothing says vacation like a “Wish you Were Here” postcard to friends or family.

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, Jul 15, 2015
by Ned Wazowski

Old, older, oldest

When recreating an object that has had many different lives, you have to ask yourself: Which history do you want?