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Space Cadet - Spaceman Jax Fanclub Pin - 1961


Spaceman Jax - Space Cadet - Spaceman Jax Fanclub Pin - 1961 - pin with bronze finish in package  - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

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$7.95

Space Cadet - Spaceman Jax Fanclub Pin - 1961

Are you an official Space Cadet?

For a period in the early 1960s, Spaceman Jax was part of a balanced breakfast for kids everywhere.  The show was sponsored by Sunington Morn Breakfast Cereals, and merchandise for Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures hit supermarket shelves even before the first episode hit the airwaves.  But whether kids saw him first on TV or a cereal box, Spaceman Jax – the “hero with a heart of gold, and the intellect of a Ploridian Lunar Beast” – won a legion of fans. 

These die-struck pins are exact replicas of the original fan club pins released in 1961.  And thanks to Curio & Co., you don’t have to collect box tops to get them! 

 

Details 

Year: 2011 (based on the original released in 1961) 

Size: 0.8 in (2 cm) wide 

Finish: Bronze


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Spaceman Jax - Spaceman Jax - Through the Mantagon Minefield - comic book cover - Ringer Comics - Silver Age comic book - issue one - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Spaceman Jax - Through the Mantagon Minefield

Spaceman Jax

Pre-order this real gem from the Silver Age of Comic at a pre-order bargain price of $4.95 $3.95.   It's...

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$3.95
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Spaceman Jax - Space Cadet - Spaceman Jax Fanclub Pin - 1961 - pin with bronze finish in package  - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Space Cadet - Spaceman Jax Fanclub Pin - 1961

Spaceman Jax

Are you an official Space Cadet? For a period in the early 1960s, Spaceman Jax was part of a balanced...

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$7.95
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Spaceman Jax - Spaceman Jax Model Sheet - Various poses of Jax, title of model sheet and Pud film studio copyrights stamps - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Spaceman Jax Model Sheet

Spaceman Jax

This reproduction of the original Spaceman Jax model sheet is a limited edition giclée print and all are signed by...

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$95.00
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Spaceman Jax - Mantagons - Comparative Size - Line-up of various Mantagons types, title of model sheet and Pud film studio copyrights stamps - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Mantagons - Comparative Size

Spaceman Jax

This reproduction of the original Mantagon model sheet #1- Character Comparison drawn by designer Philip La Carta is a giclée print...

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$49.00
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Spaceman Jax - Mantagons - Privates - Various poses of mantagons, title of model sheet and Pud film studio copyrights stamps - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Mantagons - Privates

Spaceman Jax

This reproduction of the original Mantagon model sheet #2- Privates drawn by designer Philip La Carta is a giclée print edition....

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$49.00
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Spaceman Jax - "A Jax by Any Other Name" - Jax hugs Jax - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

"A Jax by Any Other Name"

Spaceman Jax

Giclee reproduction of original production drawing by Jim Dewicky is from the episode “A Jax by Any Other Name” broadcast...

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$49.00
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Spaceman Jax
Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures 

was first broadcast in 1961, sponsored by Sunington Morn Breakfast Cereals.  It was created by Bill Pendergast and Leo Ulrich, and designed by Philip La Carta (who also designed Brigadier Buffalo and Manfred J. Platypus, P.I.).  The show was the first big success for P.U.D. Film, and though it originally ran for just three seasons, it has continued to enjoy success in syndication.

The show featured work by animators such as Jim Dewicky and Bud Marsh.  Spaceman Jax (the “hero with a heart of gold, and the intellect of a Ploridian Lunar Beast”) was...


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, Apr 21, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Catchphrases catching fire

Curio & Co. looks at how popular film quotes and catchphrases enter the pop culture subconscious. Film still of classic black and white film Casablanca with Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, one of our favorite films at Curio and Co. www.curioandco.com.

Beam me up, Scotty. Play it again, Sam…How can it not be in the film if we know the catchphrase so well?

Pop culture is full of famous catchphrases, and our conversations around the office here at Curio & Co. are littered with movie quotes and old advertising slogans. We can have whole conversations about everyday topics just using favorite lines.

For most of us, these catchphrases become part of the stock repertoire of expressions that we use in normal conversation, so that we may even forget where they originated. I guess then we have to admit that we’re not really quoting anymore – those phrases (and the products they might be promoting) become part of our subconscious. And with over 150 years of recorded speech to draw upon, we have a lot of material available.

Take the film And Now a Word from Our Sponsor, released in 2013 (and it’s title, a well known phrase). In that film, an ad executive wakes up in the hospital and is only able to speak in ad slogans. You might not thing he has much to say, or that his catchphrases don’t allow him to carry on a meaningful conversation, but you’d be wrong. Not only is he able to keep the plot going but he changes the lives of those around him.

But if these catchphrases are such a meaningful part of pop culture, how did we manage to conjure up some of the most famous ones out of thin air? Because some of the most memorable (Just the facts, ma’am/Elementary, my dear Watson/You dirty rat!/Do you feel lucky, punk?/We don’t need no stinkin’ badges!) were never actually spoken in film, TV or in literature.

In the case of “Play it again, Sam,” the closest any of the characters get is to say “Play it, Sam. Play As Time Goes By.” So it must be a case of listening between the lines. We don’t hear those exact words in that exact order, but we know that’s what the characters are saying, perhaps. Or maybe, in the case of “Beam me up, Scotty,” we’re hearing a kind of shorthand: since it varies every time the characters get close to the line (“Scotty, beam us up…Three to beam up, Scotty…Beam me out of here, Scotty!”), our brains try to approximate what the average between all the versions could be.

It all just goes to show how much pop culture becomes a part of our lives and our social DNA. Our favorite characters and films really do take on new life as we experience them, and continue to live on in catchphrases.

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by Ned Wazowski

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Classic films or old films?

Will future generations be able to watch black and white films at all?

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Brought to you by Sunnington Morn

Where would Saturday morning cartoons be without cereal manufacturers?

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Ringer Comics

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by Ned Wazowski

When it’s okay to miss the mark

Bloopers prove that the best part of something might be the mistakes.