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Space Cadet - Spaceman Jax Fanclub Pin - 1961


Spaceman Jax - Space Cadet - Spaceman Jax Fanclub Pin - 1961 - pin with bronze finish in package  - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

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$7.95

Space Cadet - Spaceman Jax Fanclub Pin - 1961

Are you an official Space Cadet?

For a period in the early 1960s, Spaceman Jax was part of a balanced breakfast for kids everywhere.  The show was sponsored by Sunington Morn Breakfast Cereals, and merchandise for Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures hit supermarket shelves even before the first episode hit the airwaves.  But whether kids saw him first on TV or a cereal box, Spaceman Jax – the “hero with a heart of gold, and the intellect of a Ploridian Lunar Beast” – won a legion of fans. 

These die-struck pins are exact replicas of the original fan club pins released in 1961.  And thanks to Curio & Co., you don’t have to collect box tops to get them! 

 

Details 

Year: 2011 (based on the original released in 1961) 

Size: 0.8 in (2 cm) wide 

Finish: Bronze


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Spaceman Jax - Spaceman Jax - Through the Mantagon Minefield - comic book cover - Spaceman Jax - Ringer Comics - Silver Age comic book - issue one - Humor - Retro design - Curio & Co. - www.curioandco.com - Jax, Dekkin and Mantagon on conver  - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Spaceman Jax - Through the Mantagon Minefield

Spaceman Jax

Pre-order this real gem from the Silver Age of Comic at a pre-order bargain price of $4.95 $3.95.   It's...

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$3.95
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Spaceman Jax - Space Cadet - Spaceman Jax Fanclub Pin - 1961 - pin with bronze finish in package  - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Space Cadet - Spaceman Jax Fanclub Pin - 1961

Spaceman Jax

Are you an official Space Cadet? For a period in the early 1960s, Spaceman Jax was part of a balanced...

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$7.95
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Spaceman Jax - Spaceman Jax Model Sheet - Various poses of Jax, title of model sheet and Pud film studio copyrights stamps - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Spaceman Jax Model Sheet

Spaceman Jax

This reproduction of the original Spaceman Jax model sheet is a limited edition giclée print and all are signed by...

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$95.00
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Spaceman Jax - Mantagons - Comparative Size - Line-up of various Mantagons types, title of model sheet and Pud film studio copyrights stamps - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Mantagons - Comparative Size

Spaceman Jax

This reproduction of the original Mantagon model sheet #1- Character Comparison drawn by designer Philip La Carta is a giclée print...

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$49.00
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Spaceman Jax - Mantagons - Privates - Various poses of mantagons, title of model sheet and Pud film studio copyrights stamps - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

Mantagons - Privates

Spaceman Jax

This reproduction of the original Mantagon model sheet #2- Privates drawn by designer Philip La Carta is a giclée print edition....

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$49.00
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Spaceman Jax - "A Jax by Any Other Name" - Jax hugs Jax - by Curio & Co. (Curio and Co. OG) www.curioandco.com

"A Jax by Any Other Name"

Spaceman Jax

Giclee reproduction of original production drawing by Jim Dewicky is from the episode “A Jax by Any Other Name” broadcast...

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$49.00
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Spaceman Jax
Spaceman Jax and the Galactic Adventures 

was first broadcast in 1961, sponsored by Sunington Morn Breakfast Cereals.  It was created by Bill Pendergast and Leo Ulrich, and designed by Philip La Carta (who also designed Brigadier Buffalo and Manfred J. Platypus, P.I.).  The show was the first big success for P.U.D. Film, and though it originally ran for just three seasons, it has continued to enjoy success in syndication.

The show featured work by animators such as Jim Dewicky and Bud Marsh.  Spaceman Jax (the “hero with a heart of gold, and the intellect of a Ploridian Lunar Beast”) was...


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, Sep 01, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Summer Cinema: Jaws, 1975

Curio & Co. looks at classic summer blockbuster Jaws which offers quite a few reasons not to worry about skipping the beach. www.curioandco.com

Maybe skip the water altogether this weekend.

There’s nothing worse than working while everyone else is away on vacation. Not only are you picking up the slack for your coworkers, but some have the nerve to send those “Wish you were here” postcards back to the office just to rub your nose in it. But don’t let sour grapes ruin your day. Maybe all you need is a reminder that beach vacations aren’t all they’re cracked up to be. Jaws will help you feel better about skipping the beach.

From the beginning, Jaws was set to attack. The book by Peter Benchley generated a lot of early attention, and the film rights were purchased even before it was published in 1974. By the time the film came out in the summer of 1975, the book had sold over five and a half million copies, and the film would later go on to become the highest grossing film in history to that point. But from the beginning of the production, the film was in deep water.

Producers chose a 26-year-old director who was coming off the success of his first feature film. However, Steven Spielberg was naïve enough to eschew filming outdoor scenes in a Hollywood tank, opting instead for the waters off Martha’s Vineyard. Shooting on the ocean caused numerous problems, not the least of which was a ship that starting sinking with all three primary cast members on board. Trouble extended to everything in the water, too. The film’s extensive effects and expensive sharks pushed the film way over budget, especially as the three sharks built were constantly malfunctioning. The crew go to calling the production “Flaws” after the problematic mechanical sharks (one of which sank on its first day in the water).

Furthermore, filming began without a complete script, since Spielberg was unhappy with the first two acts of the book and the film was still being rewritten on location. Each scene was finished the night before it was to be shot, with cast and crew not exactly sure what to expect for the next day’s filming. What’s more, actor Robert Shaw who played the film’s shark hunter would fly to Canada as soon as his scenes were shot, in order to avoid the US tax authorities, but when he was on set he spent most of his time drinking and arguing with Richard Dreyfuss.

All of these problems caused the film to get way, way behind schedule: They were scheduled for 55 days of shooting, but finally wrapped after 159 days. Forget the shark, the studio must have been out for blood!

There seems to have been a silver lining to all of this, however, and some of these problems might have made for a better film. Spielberg’s insistence on shooting on location rather than a tank made all the difference in the overall quality of the film, with the scenes on the water especially naturalistic and believable. Problems with the shark meant that the mechanical props had to sometimes be done away with altogether, and attack scenes show from the shark’s perspective instead. Film critics agree that this technique is what makes the film so suspenseful and the reason the film’s popularity is so enduring. Finally, rewriting the script on set meant it was possible for many people to collaborate, and the film’s most famous line (“You’re going to need a bigger boat”) was contributed by actor Roy Scheider.

Still, as good as the film is, Jaws does not make you want to rush out and book a beach holiday. Overall beach attendance was down in 1975, and I think it’s fair to attribute some of that to people who saw the film. So when it seems like everyone else is away on vacation and you’re stuck at the office, Jaws might just make you feel better about being on dry land.

Did you know? The crew nicknamed the shark “Bruce” after the name of Spielberg’s lawyer.

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, Aug 21, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Where, exactly, is Spaceman Jax?

Is Spaceman Jax like Star Wars – set in a galaxy far, far away?

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, Aug 18, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Summertime Treats: Watermelon

The refreshing fruit that takes you right back to childhood.

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, Aug 14, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Summer Cinema: Beach Blanket Bingo, 1965

When the temperature goes up, it’s time for something silly.

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, Aug 12, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Kids' secret energy sources

Spaceman Jax’s niece Dekkin seems to run on super power.

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, Aug 08, 2014
by Ned Wazowski

Spaceman Jax, Pitchman from the Stars

Even a galactic hero can’t say no to advertising money.